Interior of a hospital

Infrastructure Ontario (IO) and Niagara Health have prequalified the EllisDon Infrastructure Healthcare (EDIH) team as one of three bid teams for the new South Niagara Hospital Project in Niagara Falls, Ontario – and we’re excited to be part of this design team, providing Mechanical Engineering and Materials Management/Conveyance Consulting (automated guided vehicles).

The project is on a greenfield site in Niagara Falls ON, and will be part of Niagara Health’s connected healthcare system. The acute care hospital will feature*:

  • 24/7 Emergency Department; diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical services; medical, surgical and intensive care inpatient beds
  • Ambulatory Services; post-acute Complex Continuing Care (CCC) inpatient services
  • Centres of Excellence specializing in stroke, complex care, geriatric/psychogeriatrics and wellness in aging
  • Designed with the next age of innovation in mind, the South Niagara Hospital will seamlessly integrate technology that supports high quality healthcare.

For area residents, an important aspect of the new South Niagara Hospital project will be the amalgamation of services, providing easier access to care in a centralized location. As well, the new site will have a focus on seniors and accessibility, along with high standards for infection prevention and control embedded into all aspects of the patient experience.

The hospital will be designed to achieve LEED Silver, in addition to targeting Canada’s first WELL®-certification for a healthcare facility. While the LEED standard relates to buildings, the WELL standard focuses on occupants, in this case on the health and well-being of staff, physicians, volunteers, patients, families and caregivers and the Niagara community.
* Source: https://www.infrastructureontario.ca/South-Niagara-Hospital/

Send medical equipment robot technology in hospital

Interest in and implementation of Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) has become more common in healthcare capital projects, with clients recognizing the value these systems can bring in terms of productivity, safety and efficiency. While AGVs have been in use for some time in other industries, a hospital AGV system differs from these in that its ability to consistently achieve performance parameters and throughput is heavily influenced by both the users and the technical performance of the system. In hospitals, a large number of users from many different programs (eg., food service, pharmacy, logistics) must interact with the system. The ability to prevent backlogs and ensure critical deliveries relies on strict adherence to the AGV schedule, cart removal timing, and coordination with a central operator. The technical performance of the system is highly influenced by the space programmed, elevator capacity, programming and system capabilities, which differ among vendors.

Some factors driving increased adoption of AGVs by healthcare clients include:

  • The increased floor plate associated with new hospital builds, as a result of a higher ratio of single-patient rooms and improved circulation space
  • Improvements in sensor technology that have greatly enhanced the performance of AGVs in areas such as collision avoidance and environment recognition, navigation, fleet management, material tracking, and the ability to conduct detailed diagnostics and maintenance of individual vehicles
  • A greater need to improve sanitation (cleanliness) in the hospital environment, as well as the increased priority to disinfect various spaces (i.e. UV robots) – also supporting minimizing hospital acquired infections
  • Increasing labour costs, and a focus on workplace injury prevention

Benefits that can be realized include:

  • Improved productivity. AGVs can reduce supply chain management costs and deliver reliability of supplies compared to non-automated methods.
  • Availability. AGVs can operate on a 24/7/365 basis. Advances in battery technology have significantly shortened battery charging times, resulting in AGV systems that can be designed to be on call throughout the entire day to respond to demand. This also means that distribution can be scheduled for off-peak hours.
  • Reduced damage to facilities. With improved collision detection and environmental recognition, well designed AGV systems can almost eliminate damage to doors, walls, elevators and other structures in the hospital while also ensuring safety as they are programmed to never collide with other objects (including people).
  • Predictability. Because AGVs are programmed to operate to a schedule, it becomes easier to schedule complementary resources within the same delivery periods.

AGVs are currently being used for a range of tasks in hospitals. These include pick-up and delivery of meals, waste, linens, sterile supplies, medications, and other supplies. The systems are quite sophisticated and are capable of activating and navigating automatic doors, signaling and navigating elevators (both dedicated and shared), delivering carts for cleaning, activating cart-washing systems, and are able to safely navigate busy spaces, such as hallways and elevators, that are shared with humans. The use cases for AGVs increase as we discover more needs they can support!

Medical delivery robots moving in hospital. Infection prevention concept. 3D rendering image.

Designing AGV Systems

In designing AGV systems for healthcare facilities, HH Angus has the specialized expertise and experience to produce exceptional results in a highly technical process that requires insight and knowledge of healthcare facilities operations and logistics, vendor experience, and a depth of networking and integration expertise. Our Angus Connect Division is a Canadian leader in delivering forward-thinking and robust digital and technology strategies, along with design and implementation for healthcare and other facilities.

At the outset, our team examines our clients’ overall business objectives and operational goals. Some of these include improved supply management for clinical services, timely medication dispensing, and reduction in portering and housekeeping steps to deliver supplies. Drawing on our clinical, building and AGV design experience, we collaborate with the client to understand their vision, and then contribute our deep knowledge of materials management, hospital flows and implementation of AGV systems to successfully tie together workflows and technical requirements. Taking time early in the design stage to fully understand the project requirements allows us to track changes in client requirements that can occur over the design and construction life of the project. Ensuring the operational assumptions and the AGV and hospital designs align with the overall goals of our clients is crucial to delivering a successful AGV system.

Through our extensive experience with the P3 (public-private partnership) model, both in proponent and compliance roles, we have developed some methodologies for success, which include:

Informed Decision Making Based on Clinical and Hospital Operations Best Practices

Our Connect team has significant knowledge of hospital operations, with the expertise of four clinicians who bring hands-on experience and consulting advisory on process flows.  We also bring the knowledge gained from previous AGV and materials management work with key hospital clients, such as Providence Health Care for its New St. Paul’s Hospital, Alberta Health Services for its proposed New Edmonton Hospital, the Nova Scotia Health Authority for the QEII Halifax Infirmary Expansion, and SickKids Hospital as part of its massive Project Horizon Redevelopment project. Work on over 10 large-scale AGV projects globally has given us an in-depth appreciation for the technical and operating challenges our clients face when implementing an AGV system. Given the heavy clinical and operational implications of AGVs, clients have often extended our team’s engagement in order to provide comprehensive planning, design and compliance support.

By combining our clinical and technical skillsets and AGV knowledge, we were able to deliver a design that was highly commended by the hospital.

The significance of this was put into particular focus during our proponent role for the New St. Paul’s Hospital. We were able to support the hospital in defining their scheduling and operational assumptions, developed a well-thought out AGV design that recognized infection control and staff safety requirements, and applied LEAN design principles to optimize workflows, creating optimal efficiency for supply chain management across the site. By combining our clinical and technical skillsets and AGV knowledge, we were able to deliver a design that was highly commended by the hospital.

Rendering of New St. Paul's Hospital BC
New St. Paul's Hospital BC (Rendering courtesy of PCL & Providence Health Care)

Elements of a Successful Implementation

A key to a successful AGV system is fully defining the operational processes of the AGV users in concert with the AGV system design. It is heavily dependent upon the human interfaces with the system, such as users respecting the design of the AGV Cart Matrix, prompt removal of carts upon delivery within the design time parameters, keeping all AGV areas free of obstacles, cart alignment, and having a central operator who monitors the system, proactively ensuring on-time deliveries and preventing system backlog. It is critical that the AGV and associated departmental operations, policies, procedures and staffing are reflected in the basis of design. In addition to these operational impacts, throughput of an AGV system is also significantly influenced by the design of the system, including space (including corridor widths, send/receive locations, and elevator lobbies), design of routes, the technical capability of the system, proper maintenance, WiFi, Local Area Network (LAN), elevator capacity, and integrations with the fire alarm and access control systems.

There are key differences between the implementation of AGVs in new builds versus existing sites. To name just a few, AGVs require wider corridors and pathways that support their turning radius’, specially-designed elevator lobbies that support not only the AGV navigation but also the cart-associated workflows, elevator type and capacity, battery charging locations, maintenance rooms and ‘send and receive’ locations within programs. The required space is driven by the AGV schedule and cart quantities, thereby making early planning critical to the end success of the system. While new builds can incorporate these requirements into early planning by ensuring the programmed space captures these, there are limitations to retrofitting existing hospital buildings with an AGV system due to narrow hallways, non-compliant elevators and WiFi limitations. While a thorough examination is needed to determine the options available to existing sites, there have been promising advances in Automated Mobile Robots (AMRs) that can help automate certain supply management services such as food, medication and supply delivery. AMRs do not require the same space requirements as AGVs and therefore can mitigate the need for renovations, making it a cost-effective technology for organizations interested in automating their supply chain management processes or implementing just-in-time deliveries.

Our team has experience developing AGV business cases, cost estimates, cart matrixes, specifications, and technical design on several large AGV-related projects, including SickKids, New Edmonton Hospital, Halifax Infirmary, and the New St. Paul’s hospital. These projects have provided us with a wealth of lessons learned and experience, allowing us to provide expert consulting for the successful planning, design, implementation, ongoing operation and maintenance of your AGV system.

For more information about how our AGV experience can help your healthcare facility, please contact:

Megan Angus

Megan Angus, RN, MBA, Lean
Division Director, Angus Connect
megan.angus@hhangus.com

Headshot of Robyn Munro

Robyn Munro, RN
ICAT Analyst, Angus Connect
robyn.munro@hhangus.com

Screen capture of the French website

Aujourd'hui, nous lançons notre site Web en français pour fournir des informations concises et pertinentes pour soutenir notre présence croissante au Québec au cours des 11 dernières années. Nous vous invitons à visiter le site en utilisant le lien ci-dessous.

Today we're launching our French website to provide concise and relevant information to support our growing presence in Quebec over the last 11 years. We invite you to visit the site using the link below.
www.hhangus.com/fr

June 3rd, 2021
1:00 PM – 2:15 PM EDT
Panel Discussion including live Q&A

Bedroom for patient in a hospital, Empty bed and wheelchair on hospital ward

COVID-19 treatment has created a sharp increase in the need for isolation rooms now and in future expansion and redevelopment plans. As a follow-up to its March session on “Isolation Room Design” that outlined design principles and strategies, the Canadian Centre for Healthcare Facilities is bringing together a multi-disciplinary panel in a special session to share insights and answer audience questions. The panel of subject matter experts will share their experiences and insights in healthcare settings from planning, design, architectural, maintenance and operations perspectives. The audience will have the opportunity to share comments and ask questions, in order to better understand the unique considerations at hospitals and other care settings as the need for Isolation Rooms increases during the current pandemic and in plans going forward.

To register, go to www.cchf.net or click on the link below.
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vIlOFdjHQmqjqcCchGhH4A

Panelists:

Gordon Burrill, P.Eng., FASHE, CHFM, CHC
President, Teegor Consulting & CCHF Co-founder, Board of Directors' President

Craig Doerksen
Divisional Director, Facility Management, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg

Jessica Fullerton, M.Sc. CIC
Construction Lead – Infection Prevention and Infection Prevention and Control, The Ottawa Hospital

Scott Patterson, P.Eng., PMP
Senior Director, Facilities Planning and Development, Sinai Health

Robin Snell
Principal, Parkin Architects Limited

Nick Stark, P. Eng., CED, LEED AP, ICD.D
Vice-President Knowledge Management, HH Angus and Associates 

Moderator:

Rita Mezei, MSc.
Executive Director & Co-Founder, CCHF

COVID-19 treatment has created a sharp increase in the need for isolation rooms now and in future expansion and redevelopment plans. As a follow-up to its March session on “Isolation Room Design” that outlined design principles and strategies, the Canadian Centre for Healthcare Facilities is bringing together a multi-disciplinary panel in a special session to share insights and answer audience questions. The panel of subject matter experts will share their experiences and insights in healthcare settings from planning, design, architectural, maintenance and operations perspectives. The audience will have the opportunity to share comments and ask questions, in order to better understand the unique considerations at hospitals and other care settings as the need for Isolation Rooms increases during the current pandemic and in plans going forward.

To register, go to www.cchf.net or click on the link below.
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vIlOFdjHQmqjqcCchGhH4A

Panelists:

Gordon Burrill, P.Eng., FASHE, CHFM, CHC
President, Teegor Consulting & CCHF Co-founder, Board of Directors' President

Craig Doerksen
Divisional Director, Facility Management, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg

Jessica Fullerton, M.Sc. CIC
Construction Lead – Infection Prevention and Infection Prevention and Control, The Ottawa Hospital

Scott Patterson, P.Eng., PMP
Senior Director, Facilities Planning and Development, Sinai Health

Robin Snell
Principal, Parkin Architects Limited

Nick Stark, P. Eng., CED, LEED AP, ICD.D
Vice-President Knowledge Management, HH Angus and Associates 

Moderator:

Rita Mezei, MSc.
Executive Director & Co-Founder, CCHF

HH Angus employee using a Matterport scanner

In the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, 3D reality capture is the process of scanning a building, portion of a building, equipment or site in the real world and converting the scanned data into a useful 3D digital model. A physical space is scanned using various technologies to collect huge amounts of spatial data to create different types of 3D visualization—from 360 degree 4K videos and photorealistic walkthroughs to 3D mesh or point clouds models. Whether using LIDAR-based technology or technology based on photogrammetry, knowing which technology to use for a given application is key to solving the challenges our clients are facing in the operation and maintenance of their facilities.  

Why use it?

While you can use traditional 2D design and as-built drawings for a project, 3D reality capture can offer many benefits over the traditional approach, including saving time, reducing costs and improving accuracy.

Barriers to adoption decreasing. The cost of 3D scanners and other reality capture hardware has become increasingly affordable, even as quality and features continue to improve. Also, the software has become very intuitive and easy-to-use.

Highly accurate and reliable information. The reliability of existing as-built 2D drawings often varies from project to project and can be a pain point in retrofits and renovations. Instead of depending on outdated drawings or time-consuming manual measurements or surveys, reality capture technology can capture existing site conditions very efficiently and accurately. The 3D scan and resultant 3D models can then be quickly actioned by importing into the BIM software of choice and utilized by the entire project team.

Create efficiencies. Due to its accuracy and speed, reality capture reduces the need for multiple site visits – many of which are typically made simply to re-measure or double check survey results. By ‘capturing once’, project teams can use 3D scans or BIM models to derive more insights and identify potential conflicts or opportunities much earlier in the design and construction process. 

Scan to BIM. By scanning the existing conditions and creating a functional BIM model, teams can begin designing immediately, allowing for greater accuracy, reduction in rework and shortening project schedules.

Improved collaboration. We typically make the resulting 3D scans and/or BIM models available in the cloud, allowing everyone involved in the design and construction process to access the one model from anywhere. Teams can be based anywhere and have the ability to view and interact with the data in real-time – making notes, providing feedback, taking measurements of existing site conditions from the 3D model, and making iterative design changes in a highly interactive and collaborative way.

Documenting progress. Reality Capture allows for fast and efficient documentation of construction progress. Regular scans of the site help ensure that construction is matching the design intent and allows the team to discover discrepancies before they become costly mistakes.  

How HH Angus is Using Reality Capture

3D reality capture is very convenient, allowing us to capture dimensionally-accurate records of systems infrastructure (usually hidden above ceilings, under floors or behind walls), without having to rely on sketches or individual photos. Each 3D reality capture tool has unique advantages and applications. Knowing which tool is the best resource in a given situation forms part of the expertise of HH Angus’ technical staff.

Our current in-house technologies capture site data via a Matterport scanner or Theta V 360 camera. The Matterport scanner has an accuracy of 99% to reality; plus 3D scans are captured in 4K, providing very detailed high-resolution images. The scans are hosted on the Matterport cloud platform, and users can easily access or share them through any web browser. We can also produce point cloud data from the Matterport scans, which can be imported into a Revit model for our clients or their third-party vendors, such as architects, contractors, facility maintenance staff, other engineering disciplines, etc. 

Point cloud
Point cloud
Reality
Reality
3D model
3D model

One of the features of the Matterport platform is the ability to create links to specific site locations in the model. Users simply click on a link to be taken instantly to a detailed 360-degree view of that area or equipment within the site model, providing real benefit to clients, their facility managers and third-party vendors.

This virtual walkthrough showcases some of the potential benefits of a Matterport walkthrough for a mechanical room. You can tag significant features, embed drawings and manuals, and create links to external documents or webpages.

Click on the image below to load the Matterport model which you can interact with and navigate in this screen.

 

Having detailed interactive maps of facility infrastructure provides important resources for future projects. The virtual walk-throughs created using the Theta V 360 camera can replace the contractors’ physical walk-through during the Tender process, freeing up client personnel traditionally required to host the walk-throughs, as well as reducing travel time, parking costs, and the carbon footprint that would otherwise be incurred for bidders traveling to and from site.  For clients interested in decreasing the carbon footprint of their operations and facilities, any opportunity to reduce pollution and wasted time makes a great deal of sense. During COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, scans produced by the Matterport scanner or 360 images and video created by the Theta V 360 are providing immense value, making remote site access possible for a range of project stakeholders. The Matterport model also provides a reliable resource for measurements that may be required for scope changes, or that may have been missed during in-person site visits. This makes return visits unnecessary and reduces time demands and the need for off-hours availability for clients who would otherwise have to be on site for these return visits.

Digital Twinning. We also see the vast potential of digital twining and the visualization of live data. In this basic digital twin, we have visualized whether the space airflow is meeting CSA 317.2 requirements. You can filter the model by level, highlight rooms that are out of range, and even zoom into a room that’s experiencing flow issues. The intent of the model is to provide visualizations that allow facility operators to decipher information more easily and make informed decisions faster.

Below is an example of a basic digital twin. Click on the image which will launch the digital twin in a new page.

Courtesy of Lett Architects

LIDARAnother major player in 3D scanning technologies is LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), essentially radar with laser.  You may have already have heard of LIDAR applications being used in autonomous driving test vehicles and in drone technology. Costs have been dropping steadily for previously expensive terrestrial scanners, and it’s now available on the Apple iPhone 12 Pro and the Apple iPad Pro.  LIDAR combines camera images with radar and laser to construct 3D images in real time in order to create a point cloud. Currently, HH Angus is testing how our proprietary HH Angus Onsite app could sync with a smartphone’s LIDAR capabilities to overcome data limits, and how it might fit into project workflows to replace some of the existing programs we’re using in the reality capture service we provide to clients. The intent is to create more efficiencies. Stay tuned for more developments as mobile LIDAR technology improves.

LIDAR on iPhone

We’re really excited about the value Reality Capture brings to our clients and our workflow. We’re even more excited about its future; from improved capabilities with tools like drones, mobile devices, and robots, to building intelligent digital twins leveraging IoT sensors that can continue with the building past design and into post-occupancy to continually monitor and improve occupancy and operating conditions.

For more information about how our scanning technologies can benefit your facilities, please contact:

Headshot of Akira Jones

Akira Jones, P.Eng.
BIM Leader
akira.jones@hhangus.com

Headshot of Melissa Parry

Melissa Parry, CanBIM P1, ACP Revit MEP
BIM Coordinator
melissa.parry@hhangus.com