TD Bank Group 

TD5 ETS CSTS Tenant Fitout

Our team worked with existing structural interferences (extensive/deep structural beams with limited openings) to identify routing for new M&E infrastructure. We also engaged in multi-discipline coordination and planning on site with contractors to find pathways/alternative methods to meet the demands of the project.

HH Angus was engaged to design a full floor fitout in Tower 5 of Toronto’s iconic TD Centre. Our scope included mechanical, electrical and lighting design services. The fitout design and construction established a new floor standard for TD Bank spaces going forward.

Our electrical scope included power distribution; open ceiling café lighting design to meet both the client’s design choices and base building standards; integration of an all-new wireless lighting control system, including occupancy, daylight, and custom dimming control; life safety systems; and infrastructure for AV & security systems.

The mechanical work consisted of a new HVAC layout to accommodate the new reflected ceiling plan design, which included the open ceiling café design, supplemental cooling systems, plumbing services, and sprinkler modifications to suit the floor layout.

Among the challenges of the project were some structural limitations. Coring restrictions necessitated a power re-design to eliminate floor monuments with cores. 

SERVICES
Mechanical Engineering | Electrical Engineering | Lighting Design


PROJECT FEATURES
Status: Completed 2019 | Fitout represented a new floor standard for TD Bank | Existing space demolished to floor plate | Structural interferences required creative solutions for routing of services


LOCATION 
Toronto, Ontario


KEY SCOPE ELEMENTS
New HVAC layout | New lighting and control system


Interior of TD5 ETS CSTS Tenant Fitout
Interior of TD5 ETS CSTS Tenant Fitout

Images courtesy of HOK

Toronto Public Library 

Wychwood Branch

The Wychwood Library is one of Toronto's oldest libraries, built in 1915/16 and listed among Toronto's designated Heritage Properties.  The work now underway is required to support delivery of current and future services.

HH Angus is engaged as the mechanical and electrical engineering consultant for the renovation and expansion of the Wychwood Branch of the Toronto Public Library. Following a feasibility study that identified the desired expansion was possible, the facility is expanding from 6,381 ft2 to 15,000 ft2, with mechanical and electrical systems being replaced throughout the facility, including new incoming electrical and communication services.

The project includes interior and exterior renovations to building structure, mechanical and electrical systems and a complete redesign of the floor space. Necessary facility upgrades include replacing flooring, millwork, furniture, elevator and heating, ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems and equipment, building systems, and building envelope repairs.

The redesign of this heritage facility will create room for approximately 2000 ft2 of seniors’ space and innovative space for youth, both of which are needed in the community.

SERVICES
Mechanical Engineering | Electrical Engineering | Lighting Design


PROJECT FEATURES
Heritage building | Green roof on expansion


LOCATION 
Toronto, Ontario


KEY SCOPE ELEMENTS
Interior and exterior renovation | 2-storey expansion | Mechanical and electrical systems replaced throughout | New incoming electrical and communication services


Interior of Toronto Public Library, Wychwood Branch

Celebrating heritage

Key features of the original building were maintained and highlighted through the lighting design, which emphasized the brick exterior and vaulted ceilings in the Great Hall.

Image credits: Shoalts and Zaback Architects Ltd.

TD Bank

Living Roof

“The Green Council [tenant representatives] has made it clear, through a commitment to action, that sustainability is a core value of TD Centre tenants.”

David Hoffman, then-General Manager. TD Centre

At the TD Centre’s iconic towers in downtown Toronto, TD Bank’s Living Roof offers both environmental benefits and some much-needed green relief from the usual hardscape views had by occupants of the Centre’s towers. It covers 22,000 ft2 and is planted with creek sedge grasses, a hardy semi-evergreen native species tough enough to survive the extremes of Toronto’s climate. Annual energy savings from the green roof are approximately $23,000. This is achieved by reducing summer cooling and winter heat loss by 25%. 

HH Angus provided mechanical and electrical engineering for the green roof installation and irrigation system, as well as the project’s preliminary Feasibility Study. To avoid over-watering, the irrigation system features a sensor that shuts down the irrigation system when it rains. This sensor also reduces irrigation when the water received during previous rainfalls or irrigation has not yet evaporated.

In order to evaluate the requirements for mechanical and electrical design for the irrigation system, the ceiling plenum for the single story building below had to be surveyed. The storm water drainage system was original and would need modification and updating. The existing plumbing was modified to allow connection of the new irrigation.

Installation of dedicated electrical circuits and automated controls was required in order to operate the self-draining irrigation system. The controls were ceiling mounted with remote computer access. Rain spray heads, valves, head sensors, pattern nozzles, valve boxes, and stainless roof drains were incorporated.

Before the design could be executed, rainwater calculations were carried out based on Environment Canada data, along with spreadsheets detailing storm water run-off. These calculations assisted in sizing the storm water piping and locating roof drains and spray nozzles.

A roof leak detection system was also designed, along with a new soil pipe vent stack through the Pavilion roof, and a gooseneck conduit for rooftop wiring. A new replacement filter rack was added to the roof air vents.

SERVICES
Feasibility Study Plumbing Design | Mechanical Engineering | Electrical Engineering


PROJECT FEATURES
Size: 22,000 ft2 | Status: Completed 2015 | Annual energy savings through reduction in summer cooling requirements and in winter heat loss


LOCATION 
Toronto, Ontario


KEY SCOPE ELEMENTS
Feasibility study | Rainwater calculations | Plumbing design with supporting mechanical and electrical design and engineering | Roof leak detection system


 

Sustainable 

design 

TD Bank's Living Roof represents tenant values and is a bold expression of collaboration in support of environmental stewardship

Honouring the design

The green roof’s grid pattern mimics Mies van der Rohe’s original design for the pavilion roof. This was done to respect the ‘designated heritage site’ aspect of the TD Centre.

Images courtesy of Flynn Canada

Wildeboer Dellelce LLP   

365 Bay Street, 3 Floor Fitout


This 12-storey building is located in the heart of Toronto’s business and financial core. Constructed in 1960, the mechanical and electrical infrastructure was outdated and major redistribution and rework of the existing systems was required in order to suit the new tenant fitout.

HH Angus was engaged to provide fitout services for this commercial office renovation project. Our scope included mechanical, electrical, lighting and communications engineering design for renovations to three floors of office space for a standalone corporate finance and tax law firm.

The 8th floor consisted of renovations to 7,000 ft2 of client-facing space, including a universal washroom, meeting rooms, reception and welcome areas. A large existing boardroom was converted into multipurpose meeting space. This conversion required additional ventilation in order to accommodate up to 50 people.

A new build out included open and enclosed office space to accommodate future growth. A new universal washroom was also provided as part of the updated layout. 

Extensive demolition was required in the central part of the floor plan to accommodate the new layouts. Construction took place during working hours; therefore, special planning and design were needed to accommodate critical areas and workstations during construction. Hoarding was required to separate these areas and ensure the safety of occupants. The project schedule was very aggressive.

 

 

SERVICES
Mechanical Engineering | Electrical Engineering | Communications Design
| Lighting Design | Tenant fitout


PROJECT FEATURES
Status: Completed 2018 
 | Renovations to non-contiguous floor plates Infrastructure upgrades 


LOCATION 
Toronto, Canada 


KEY SCOPE ELEMENTS
Renovations
to three floors of office space for a standalone corporate finance and tax law firm | Heavily phased to allow tenant operations to remain active throughout construction


 

 

Innovative lighting design

Special attention was paid to highlighting unique design features, including dropped ceilings and feature walls. 

 

Centralized amenities

The 9th and 10th floor renovation covered 16,050 rentable ft2. The objective was to refresh the employee work space and create a new, centralized café space. 

 

Close

coordination

The project team was able to achieve the schedule requirements by engaging in close coordination and communication from project inception to completion.

Cadillac Fairview 

Toronto Dominion Centre

HH Angus has been working at this site since the earliest days of the Toronto Dominion Centre, Canada’s first skyscraper. We provided complete mechanical and electrical engineering services to the Toronto Dominion Bank and Cadillac Fairview (CF) in the construction of the first four towers, which total 5,600,000 ft2.

Those original iconic towers (now six) and the interconnecting below-ground shopping concourse comprise office space, underground parking and a retail and restaurant complex in the heart of downtown Toronto.

We have been involved in numerous technical infrastructure upgrades, including the installation of heat exchangers to the cooling plant in order to link to the Deep Lake Cooling system. We have provided detailed redesign of the service floors so that the space previously occupied by the cooling plant can be upgraded.

The Toronto Dominion Tower, the tallest at fifty-five stories, employs a perimeter induction heating and cooling system; all other buildings, which were designed later, employ variable air volume systems. Each building has a number of air handling plant room floors located approximately every twelve floors. This helped to minimize the size of individual pieces of equipment and the on-floor shaft sizes required.

Steam is used as the prime heating and humidification source for the Centre. Supplied from the Enwave District Energy System, the steam demand is rated at more than 70,000 kg/hr. The cooling load of over 49,000 kW is supplied by the Deep Lake Cooling system.

As part of the ongoing evaluation and revision of existing mechanical and electrical systems for this property, CF has invested in a new luminaire and ceiling combination. This investment provides tenants with base building illumination of a high quality while reducing the total lighting power density for building operations. This new luminaire system, in combination with accurate metering and appropriate building automation, is contributing to CF’s success in meeting and exceeding the ASHRAE 90.1 energy standards.

SERVICES
Mechanical Engineering | Electrical Engineering


PROJECT FEATURES
Size: 5,600,000 ft2 | Status: Ongoing


LOCATION 
Toronto, Ontario


KEY SCOPE ELEMENTS
Ongoing technical infrastructure upgrades | Installed heat exchangers to link the cooling plant to the Deep Lake cooling system | LEED Gold


The imperative of good service

“The volume of work which you perform here at the TDC, I believe, is a direct reflection of your team’s reliability, high performance, and value.”

Adrian Sluga, Former Senior Manager, Tenant Projects, Cadillac Fairview

A lasting impression

TD Centre Heritage Designation:

The TD Centre in Toronto was designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and, from 1967 to 1972, was the tallest building in Canada. A leading example of the International style, the TD Centre altered the city’s skyline while influencing many subsequent buildings across the nation.*